photography

Top 11 of 2018 by Solomon Klein

Would you look at that! We made it through another one of these year things. Marvelous.

In keeping with last year’s burgeoning tradition, I have another Top Photos of the year. Eleven this time. Working my way down to ten. Someday we’ll make it there. Maybe.

Also, been a little quiet here the past year. If you want to see more photos through the year, you can find me over on Steemit.com. It’s a little social network built around a blockchain, or something of that nature. I’ll try to put more stuff here, too, but we’ll see. We usually do.

And with that, here’s my top 11.

Up close and personal

Up close and personal

Last light

Last light

Dome of the sky

Dome of the sky

Dying light on the Rockies

Dying light on the Rockies

Gates of Cascadia

Gates of Cascadia

Arches National Monument (sans arches)

Arches National Monument (sans arches)

Oly Autumn

Oly Autumn

The lesser light

The lesser light

The blinding snow

The blinding snow

The city

The city

Down and out

Down and out

And that be that. Thanks for stopping by, and see you around!

"Learn by play..." by Solomon Klein

So, there's some long, possibly silly, though certainly heart-warbling backstory to this, but I'll spare you. The short of it is, I've been finding myself photographing mac and cheese and espresso nearly every Tuesday afternoon for the better part of half a year. This has resulted in the accumulation of a significant body of work centered around pasta and coffee. 

I didn't have any hard rules when starting out, but in the end I stuck to these three.

  1. All photos were made with my iPhone (SE)
  2. All photos were made in a square format
  3. All photos were edited in Snapseed

It wasn't necessary, but that's just what I ended up doing for all these photos.

This "project" initially started out purely as a documentary effort, and for the most part remained such. But as it progressed, I began to look at this as being more than just a documentary series. It became an exercise in "seeing". 

Ok. Maybe this was just playing. Maybe...

I think that's ok. As my good friend Daniel would say, "We learn by play". 

Playing is important, because it allows us to try things in a not-too-serious fashion. If we're doing something "for real", we stick to already-established guidelines and formulas. We don't try new things. We don't experiment. We don't explore new ways of fixing things, or solving problems.

And, I think that's sad. There is a time for work, and there's a time for play. Let's not forget to play sometimes. 

And, have some mac and cheese. It's good for you.